Jump to content

Leaderboard

Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation on 14/04/21 in all areas

  1. Detector dogs could help save bees WWW.SUNLIVE.CO.NZ Training dogs to sniff out the highly infectious bacterial disease American Foulbrood in beehives could save New Zealand’s... article on detector dogs with funding support from a number of areas/groups. Not a single word from the management agency, may speak volumes. However since taking a lot of the work inhouse and taking on new staff their stance may have changed? I didn't know "previous methods have led to inconclusive results in the field", does anyone have proof to back up such a statement? Whatever happens, I'm a supporter of both previous, current and future dogs being thoroughly trained, used and explored. It seems to me that something like this could be a game changer if we really want to eliminate AFB. Disclosure: we are blind foundation puppy raisers and therefore extemely biased and extremely dissappointed AFB sniffer dogs are not fully funded. If the agency got into this I'd support a fee increase!! Because even if it doesn't work it is worth trying super hard and I'm actually really confident it can be made to work given the performance of drug sniffer dogs and the like.
    1 point
  2. This video might be of interest? It's the short doco on the afb sniffer dog https://vimeo.com/190422712
    1 point
  3. Yo ..... I was going to get back to this, but thought it too much info for one post. Canine Modus Operandii. Dogs do not like bees, and generally once stung, get stung shy. There is a time and place for their use. Generally the handler goes out very early morning, or late in the evening, when the bees are home. Best results are on the cooler days. Warm nights when the bees are humming at the front door are not ideal. Most of the dog work on live hives is done in the winter, spring and early autumn. In the early days we had one client who employed us to scan hives prior to taking his cop off. We travelled from Westport to Hokitika, starting at about 9.00pm and finished at about 3.00am, and did , from memory, about 200 hives. We marked issues and told him to visually inspect. Out of curiosity we popped into a couple of hives the yards the next day for a look see. All the honey was gone. We surmised that no visual inspection had been done .... and never did hives with crops on for other people again. The success of the dog program is all down to the Handler. The Handler needs to be able to read the dog's body language, the ever so slight lift of the nose or the change of pace , and make a decision based on climate, scent patterns or whether the dog is just messing about. It's not for me to go into all the details and skill required because I just pay the bills for a service ..... you know how it is.... you employ a professional to get a good result. Scanning dead gear or suspect gear in the shed is a lot easier. There are no breezes to waft the scent pattern of the AFB around the area .....think deodoriser in the toilet ..... a quick puff of the can and the scent is all around the room ..... so too with AFB. Scanning dead gear or quarantine gear before it goes back on the bees is a great way to minimise AFB spread.
    1 point
  4. Kick in the teeth ..... no not really. We initiated our dog program to solve a problem that was knawing away at us .... employing overseas staff who didn't appreciate the seriousness of AFB and so making us think outside the square to solve the problem , which we have. What we discovered was that the dogs were quite good at what they did. They aren't a one shot wonder, but a very effective tool to do large scale rapid screening ..... 800 hives in an evening session was the record I think. The kick in the the teeth was when we suggested to the industry that the dogs might be quite a good tool to help control a growing problem , and there we met with a beauracratic stonewall. Funny how good ideas are so often thwarted by beaurocratic Nay Sayers ... ever see that movie where the dude gets sick of saying No in life, so decides to Yes to everything ..... and how his life suddenly got a positive spin. So kick in the the teeth ? The kick in the the teeth was from those who purport to govern how we operate ,and who stifled free thought and progress. But good things take time eh .... so lets bring it on ..... new energy to look at dogs as a cheap and effective way to mass screen hives for problems before they surface at a too late stage and the Beeman in the paddock has to foot the bill and pick up the pieces from his neighbours incompetence. One last point .... and it sort of demonstrates the lack of cohesion within the industry. Our dog program has been in operation for about ten seasons. Rene is a man with a lifetime of dog experience and steered our operation from inception to fruition and absorbed a lot of information about how dogs work around the bees and what does and doesn't work ... If the industry was a cohesive forward thinking industry it would build on that experience Reinventing the wheel is often a waste of precious resources !
    1 point
  5. That must feel like a bit of a kick in the teeth after all the work and $$ you put into your program. it’s a shame mpi didn’t support you then and we could be years down the track with this research.
    1 point
  6. I put our very low incidence of AFB these days to the fact that we've been running AFB dogs for a number of years ....persistent, patient pressure , screening and quarantines has paid dividends. Somewhere on the Net is Sarah Hights d oco ....'A million dollar Nose' that documents a day in the life of AFB dog Georgie. The agency was against the idea of dogs as a screening method from day one, then back tracked a few years ago to say they might consider the idea after 'rigorous scientific testing' ..... so at last someone has had a quiet word with MPI and persuaded them to fund some research. Lets hope the money is put to good use and something meaningful results for the wider Bee keeper community.
    1 point
This leaderboard is set to Auckland/GMT+13:00
×
×
  • Create New...