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Tutu plant identification


ChrisM
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These plants got chopped out yesterday, photos from yesterday show it slightly wilted accordingly. I'm pretty sure it is a series of young Tutu shrubs and I gave stern warning about thoroughly washing hands since it had been handled. But, hang on a minute, was I right?

 

 

 

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around there, I would say it has been too cold for passion vine hoppers. No hoppers on a series of young passion fruit vines that are planted within 50m of these photos.

 

 

Yes, looks like Tutu. Opposing leaves is the biggie. Was the stems square, that is my final ID pointer.

 

yes, sort of, but only near to the ground. I had not looked or noticed that, but I'm pretty sure it was where the branches were packed together growing out of ground.

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Where did you find them?

 

These were up in the hills behind Tauranga. The ground right where they were gets very wet in winter and a swale (berm with a gutter) was put in manage this. So, while it looks like a paddock it is also kind of a lake edge. The Tutu was growing around the edge.

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These were up in the hills behind Tauranga. The ground right where they were gets very wet in winter and a swale (berm with a gutter) was put in manage this. So, while it looks like a paddock it is also kind of a lake edge. The Tutu was growing around the edge.

Thanks for the info - was it way to spot the plants?

 

I meant easy to spot...

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close up comparison of flowers.. photos taken from the internet (!).

 

Tutu below

tutu.JPG.569cc70949367a43f08d4a1c907157a5.JPG

 

Himalayan Honey Suckle

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My plant for id below

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It is hard for me to decide. Probably safer to assume it is Tutu and kick for touch. The flowers don't seem much different in various photos I have looked at. One thing is the Himalayan honey suckle seems to have a less symmetrical leaf silouhette, like a series of linked curves whereas the tutu leaf seems more a single continuous curve along the edge?

 

Wikipedia says of the Himalayan Honey Suckle quote The leaves are opposite, dark green, 6–18 cm long and 4–9 cm broad, with an entire or wavy margin. So, I'm thinking that all my leaves were too small and none had a wavy margin.

 

a search shows a similar thread; we've been here before. Tutu plant identification and tutin

but this time the non-wavy edge leaf makes me think this is not the honeysuckle..

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IMG_0483.JPG.0ffaa5ef80a019b70e504d0525eb7c2f.JPG This is is definitely Himalayan Honeysuckle. The leaves on Tutu is more vibrant green and the Plant as a whole is quite woody. I have attached a photo of a branch from each of the plants. Hope this helps. As you can see the photo on the right is Tutu and has distinct lines up the leaves.

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It's of not much more than academic interest really, other than perhaps being firmer than usual with little Johnny re eating handfuls of the stuff. There's nowhere in NZ that does not have Tutu. Yanking the one out of your back hedge will not make an iota of difference to risk or management regime. Hunter/trampers/fishers other outdoors people have been shoving through thickets of the stuff for generations. It's not strontium 90 or polonium.

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The question is, How much do you need for it to cause a problem. I think a fair bit and urban hives should be pretty safe.

 

The thing about urban hives is that there is nearly always something in flower. The tutu not only requires enough warmth for the sap it also requires not too much wind for the hopper. The bees would prefer nectar over hopper pooh, so in town with lots of flowers the Tutu is less of a problem even if there was lots. But there is not lots. Tauranga City does have a policy of removing any Tutu on public land and it is not a sought after plant in urban gardens. My stepson was to get $5 for every plant he could find with 3km of home. But all the money stayed in my wallet. the queen cell carriers he has built were a better proposition.

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