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At last, a frame that will biodegrade, or burn clean


Alastair
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I really like the idea of these. As a hobby keeper, having to clean and redo foundation is a pain. And I refuse to buy plastic. As soon as these come in ¾ I will be all over it, seems like a great solution.

 

Economics will change. These may be the first, but they wont be the only ones for long

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3 hours ago, Sailabee said:

From a hobbyist point of view, the Russian pine is streets ahead of the local fast grown stuff, and much easier to assemble.

But it is not sustainable. 200 years to grow shipped to China, assembled and wired there, then shipped to N.Z. where people like you buy it. What is this doing to the planet and inj these ti9mes are you helping local businesses. No I think not.

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Given that >90% of hives are commercial, I'm sure that these frames are aimed at commercial beekeepers. Ecrotek has to try to stay in business and commercial beekeeping is the only thing that can do that.

 

However, if you go down the cheapest, most sustainable route using NZ pine and if you are a hobbiest, but NOT a commercial then surely the problem was already solved a long time ago. I'll repost an old photo I put on forum previously. I realise it is not to everyone's liking but even an unwired foundationless frame in a long hive would suit a lot of hobbiests...

 

tiger honey.jpg

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19 hours ago, Bighands said:

But it is not sustainable. 200 years to grow shipped to China, assembled and wired there, then shipped to N.Z. where people like you buy it. What is this doing to the planet and inj these ti9mes are you helping local businesses. No I think not.

We buy kitset, so no Chinese component, and the trees here grow in 18 years, so no comparison in the density of the wood fibres.

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Frames are one of the few things that fast grown pine  is really good for. Even New Zealand grown pine from places with harsher winters is not as good as it often contains hard winter growth rings. These are fine if they are vertical or horizontal in the timber but when they run at an angle they can deflect the frame staple. I'm not sure if this is a problem with the slow-growing foreign timber. 

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