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Varroa destructor 2020


Stoney
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7 hours ago, Stoney said:

South Island season has kicked off this month most of us will be deep into the brood with spring clean outs and a state of the nation round.. how’s the hive health looking and what treatments were used pre winter? 

I ran Ox staples full time since 2017 but last autumn used Bayvarol as found ox over winter had a hit and miss result. 

So far the only mites/damage I’ve seen was purely operator error following a severe operator  injury, OX spring treatments will go in end of this month and run through till March 21 except for during the cashcrop.. how’s your hive health/ strength and thoughts on coming season.. 

welcome first time posters as there are plenty of you that don’t post.. let’s open up and get it out there... 

92713394-318B-478B-9A08-1DD0AE7DF073.jpeg

Great photo. 

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I wish it did- just ashamed to admit to the state of my hive with a VSH queen.

Treated in March with Apivar as DWV was evident then. I've just treated again now with Staples- as the DWV is rampant.

A  hive to learn from. What I have certainly learned is that VSH is tenuous to say the least.

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Fair enough @Mummzie.. but we can all have one or two that aren’t in good shape. 

on the positive side.. if you can keep us posted on the outcome of this hive we can possibly learn something. 

It’s pretty gutting seeing a nice slab of brood with twisted wing bees emerging and without healthy emerging brood donations  they take a long time to cycle themselves through it. 

 

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On 8/08/2020 at 5:56 PM, Alastair said:

 

Re that. Despite the winter before this one's disaster, I have continued to experiment with OA strips. This winter I just put OA strips in a smallish number of hives, and was more cautious about it. What I have discovered this spring has taught me a lot. In the hives that were weaker last autumn when the strips went in, some of them have come through in pretty bad shape. That is because with the smaller bee cluster they have simply avoided the strips, and allowed the strips to box them in to a small area. And not just that, but with them not being forced to walk on the strips, they have come through weak, and with mites.

 

Hives that were strong when the strips went in, and a breed that like a big winter cluster, have done a lot better. I think that is because the big cluster means they have been all over the strips and maintained a larger number of bees. Plus, that they are walking over the strips all the time means the strips have actually done their job and killed the mites. Below is a pic I took this afternoon of such a hive. it was a strong hive when the strips went in last autumn, and never allowed itself to get boxed in.

 

I could find no evidence of any mites in the hive at all. I think this is how the strips are meant to work as per Phil. Think I am starting to figure out when it would be OK to use them, and when it would not.

 

Oh, these are not Phils staples I should add, they are home made.

 

 

 

os.jpg

I put ox staples in 12 hives last autumn. Half one site.

Very similar results. Small hives isolated their clusters away from as many staples. Bigger ones looked ok.  I tested a few and low mites. 

Strips were intact and wet, damp wet. Especially the bottom half. 

There was a noticable difference between the site. Ox strip hives smaller clusters, fewer bees. 

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On 8/08/2020 at 5:56 PM, Alastair said:

 

This winter I just put OA strips in a smallish number of hives, and was more cautious about it. What I have discovered this spring has taught me a lot. 

 

 

 

os.jpg

Looking at this pic Alastair  would it be fair to say the brood has split with the cardboard treatment and is found only on the left side? 

Ive found when placing straight through the centre over winter, most colonies, but not all, would prefer to not pass the treatment. This pic looks familiar in that sense. 

Nice to see healthy white drone brood on the first round. 

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Very often that is the case Stoney, but in this hive the brood was all through (both sides of the strips), that's why I was pleased with it. 

 

I should have taken a pic of a brood comb.

 

That was the bottom box of a 2 brood box hive, and it's something I'm seeing this spring round. The 2 box brood nests the queen seems to be able to lay both sides of the strips, I think it is because she can go past in the gap in the middle between the 2 boxes. The single box brood nests are almost invariably blocked in one side of the strips.

 

Because of this I'm going to make the next lot of strips shorter, in the hope the queen can walk around the bottom of the strips. Based on the chewing patterns I'm seeing the bottom inch or two of the strip does not get used much so I think a shorter strip might be almost as effective, we'll see.

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 10/08/2020 at 7:00 AM, Stoney said:

Looking at this pic Alastair  would it be fair to say the brood has split with the cardboard treatment and is found only on the left side? 

Ive found when placing straight through the centre over winter, most colonies, but not all, would prefer to not pass the treatment. This pic looks familiar in that sense. 

Nice to see healthy white drone brood on the first round. 

 

On 10/08/2020 at 8:09 AM, Alastair said:

I should have taken a pic of a brood comb.

 

Well here you go i got a pic Stoney. Found this site today that was treated with OA strips last autumn, I'd forgotten it was. Anyhow here's a pic of brood both sides.

 

But in fairness I should say I don't think there was much OA left in the strip. There was brood under it also. The hive was miteless, best I could tell ?.

 

 

under.jpg

Edited by Alastair
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