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Macrocarpa Beehive Boxes etc.


Shaun
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Marie Condo split to another topic

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19 minutes ago, Shaun said:

I have this season just splashed out on a new 3120 and a mill setup with a 1500mm bar to be able to mill the tree above.

I presume it is the XP model.  That is what I had as my main mill.  A fantastic saw.

I bought the 1800 mm bar specially to do a little Totara log the we found in the Manawatu River.  The log was 30 m long and 1.8 m di at the butt end.  Root ball was still attached.

It was washed down the river in the 2010 floods and my friend and I had a permit to recover and mill it from Horizon  and local Iwi.

It was a massive job.  

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1 minute ago, Trevor Gillbanks said:

I presume it is the XP model.  That is what I had as my main mill.  A fantastic saw.

I bought the 1800 mm bar specially to do a little Totara log the we found in the Manawatu River.  The log was 30 m long and 1.8 m di at the butt end.  Root ball was still attached.

It was washed down the river in the 2010 floods and my friend and I had a permit to recover and mill it from Horizon  and local Iwi.

It was a massive job.  

What did you use the timber for--- beeboxes??

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1 minute ago, Bighands said:

What did you use the timber for--- bee boxes??

 

No.  We slabbed it into 60mm thick slabs 4 m long.  We on sold most of the boards to make corporate meeting room tables.

These were very big bits of wood.

We still have a bit around.  I did make a lot of hive frames with off cuts.  Beautiful wood to machine and finish.

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I love a good day on the end of a chainsaw, you can do a lot of work and see the results. One of my first jobs was scrubbcutting down the Eastcape in from Tolaga bay and Matawai. we were clear felling native bush for caxton mills to plant toilet paper. The amount of beautiful native timber we just dropped only to be burnt for crappy pines was criminal.

Two weeks living in the bush then a weekend in town drunk on Old Tawny Port those were the days.   

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44 minutes ago, Bron said:

Omg! Never showing himself this thread! I draw the line at bench tools for bdays & Christmas! He would soooooo love a chainsaw mill!

 

At home it is obligatory to have a woman in charge of anyone - particularly a man using a chainsaw, unless you are striving to acquire the 'Marie Condo' look in the grounds. My  daughters understood that even as ten year olds.

 

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6 hours ago, Derek Johnson said:

That is a couple of pretty impressive stacks.  I would have loved to have a Lucus mill.  Have you got the 6-in or 8-in.

The 8-in can make some very big boards.

 

BTW.  Welcome to the forum.

 

Thanks Trevor, I have the 6'' model which is over 25 years old and has never missed a beat, have cut 100's of cubic metres with this great little machine. We were involved in the Cyclone Ita windthrown recovery operation here on the West coast. DOC allowed us to recover Native timber that had blown over from the cyclone. The 6'' model was perfect for this type of work as we could fly the mill into an area, mill the tree and then either man handle or fly the mill to the next tree, all sawn timber was flown out with a helicopter. No machinery other than the mill and chainsaws were allowed in the forest, we used a large terfor to move each sawlog into position for milling.

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That is so cool .... thank you for sharing .

@Sailabee , who the heck is Marie condo ....

@Dennis Crowley  I've had a week hanging on the end of a chainsaw hacking a track . The Boy and I took a walk this afternoon to recce to rest of the route ..... we reckon another month should cover it .

Not sure the Missus would put up with a month of drunkeness.

  

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2 hours ago, Sailabee said:

 

At home it is obligatory to have a woman in charge of anyone - particularly a man using a chainsaw, unless you are striving to acquire the 'Marie Condo' look in the grounds. My  daughters understood that even as ten year olds.

 

You just have to accept collateral damage if you ask a man to trim anything with a chainsaw .

7 minutes ago, jamesc said:

who the heck is Marie condo ....

Someone who would probably regard your place as a real challenge .LOL

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7 minutes ago, kaihoka said:
14 minutes ago, jamesc said:

who the heck is Marie condo ....

Someone who would probably regard your place as a real challenge .LOL

Someone who wrote a book about how we could live better, and for some bizarre reason the reviewers raved about it.  I got it out from the library and after page 1, before I comatosed, I returned it!

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KONMARI.COM

Our goal is to help more people live a life that sparks joy, and we are committed to offering the simplest, most effective tools and services to...

 

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27 minutes ago, jamesc said:

That is so cool .... thank you for sharing .

@Sailabee , who the heck is Marie condo ....

@Dennis Crowley  I've had a week hanging on the end of a chainsaw hacking a track . The Boy and I took a walk this afternoon to recce to rest of the route ..... we reckon another month should cover it .

Not sure the Missus would put up with a month of drunkeness.

  

The new track comes up over the top at 2000’, then drops down into the pines.

The plan is to have a fulltime man on sharpening and changing saw chains.

She’s a tool ready project for Jacinda.

1DB7044B-D3DA-4422-B708-FA410A36238B.jpeg

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7 hours ago, Dennis Crowley said:

I love a good day on the end of a chainsaw, you can do a lot of work and see the results. One of my first jobs was scrubbcutting down the Eastcape in from Tolaga bay and Matawai. we were clear felling native bush for caxton mills to plant toilet paper. The amount of beautiful native timber we just dropped only to be burnt for crappy pines was criminal.

Two weeks living in the bush then a weekend in town drunk on Old Tawny Port those were the days.   

You ever spew port?

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11 hours ago, Dennis Crowley said:

I love a good day on the end of a chainsaw, you can do a lot of work and see the results. One of my first jobs was scrubbcutting down the Eastcape in from Tolaga bay and Matawai. we were clear felling native bush for caxton mills to plant toilet paper. The amount of beautiful native timber we just dropped only to be burnt for crappy pines was criminal.

Two weeks living in the bush then a weekend in town drunk on Old Tawny Port those were the days.   

A lot of beautiful native timber was burnt in NZ valley to make way for farms .

Terrible waste .

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21 hours ago, jamesc said:

The plan is to have a fulltime man on sharpening and changing saw chains.

When we were in the bush, there was a gang on the other side of the valley, and they were all from the islands, they had a guy that used to sharpen their gear up at night and hunt goats for meals during the day.

20 hours ago, Gino de Graaf said:

You ever spew port?

Not that i can remember

 

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20 minutes ago, jamesc said:

That looks nice. I'm going to be really rude and say 'Toooo nice for bee boxes !'  But then again, no knots, straight, they should last several lifetimes .

The first slab is now a work bench in my shed (trimmed a bit of rot one end so now 4.5m x 650mm 65mm thick)

Second slab went to the land owner. 

Third is a bit thinner at 38mm and got cut up for a garden bed and hive frame side bars.

The rest is still on the log (another 10 or so slabs) waiting for the paddock to dry sufficiently so I can drive into and out of the gully where the log is.

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