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Essential Oil. Quality and Useage


Wildflower
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Reading about feeding. 

(Thanks to Josh. 109 pages??)

Reading old articles about Honey Bee Healthy. 

There was a recipe for X amount of water,sugar. Lecithin and 15 drops each of Lemongrass and Spearment oils ( Stating available on TM)

Q1? What exactly is the Lemongrass and Spearment good for?

( I have heard to spray Lemongrass when making a lure)

Q2? What other oils do Beeks use? And why/how?

( Thyme etc.)

I am a member of Dottera.

Their essential oils are very pure.

Many are food grade.

I regularly use lemongrass and lots of others in cooking. 3 drops of lemongrass flavours an entire curry! SO with that in mind. If making supplements, I imagine  I would not need many drops?

Anyone experemented with much of this?

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I think the core of your problem is captured in the phrase 'horrid chemical strips'. They are your hives best chance of survival, plus change whatever it was that caused the small size of the hives in the first place. Adding a cocktail of unproven essential oils will not overcame those problems. 

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Likely the problem with the small hive is the Queen is old and I haven't got round to re Queening.It has been inherently a weak hive in general this last year or so.

Not planning to make cocktails in a hurry.

Happy to follow mainstream and always treat Spring and Autumn. However knowledge of alternatives for occasional future use is appealing. HBH has spearment and lemongrass. More curious as to what the oils are 'supposed' to do. Lemongrass mimics the queens pheromone? Mites don't like Thyme? Spearmint? Have no idea.

I always try to leave bees more honey than they need, and am am under no illusion that I can get away without the use of chemicals sometimes.

Just like the idea of helping the bees be strong full stop. A bit like us taking vitamin C,echiacea etc. I also read somewhere some product have seaweed? 

The fact that there is SO little info. on this forum about the alternative stuff says it all really. Varroa is a beast of a problem.

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2 hours ago, Wildflower said:

 

The fact that there is SO little info. on this forum about the alternative stuff says it all really. Varroa is a beast of a problem.

 

One thing we hobby beeks need to understand is that if there was a brilliant blend of essential oils, or anything else that actually works, the first to give it a go are the commercials for whom it is there living. I bet that overall there is nothing published online that no one here has found and read. 

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5 hours ago, Beefriendly said:

 @Wildflower there is a very good oxalic acid and glycerine thread, on the forum. It provides plenty of information @cBankhas done a very good summary document 

 

Yes I have seen it. Will have another good look.

Strips are simple for now,but laterI want to use a range of ALL options. No point in letting the critters get used to anything.

6 hours ago, yesbut said:

If you remember this time next year you could ask me how citric acid went....

You are on. Spring 2020. ?

5 hours ago, Beefriendly said:

 @Wildflower there is a very good oxalic acid and glycerine thread, on the forum. It provides plenty of information @cBankhas done a very good summary document 

 

3 replies all the same. Seem i have some studying to do. Thanks everyone.

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@Wildflower I use HBH at times in commercial quantities - it has some pros and cons. I posted some stuff on this forum a year or two back which is essentially unchanged - search it up and have a read. Lemongrass is a particularly strong bee attractant - you’ll see it also mentioned at times for luring swarms. Spearmint I’m not sure. Lavender also gets added - it is quite aggressive towards mites, so I like to think it is doing something in that regard. Maybe it’s not, who really knows.

 

My bees are healthy and I’d like to keep them that way.  As honey prices have fallen off, so has my sugar usage (probably like many commercials).  But I still use it in particular situations - for me strong hives early for pollination is one such use.

 

cheers

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7 minutes ago, Pinnacle said:

@Wildflower I use HBH at times in commercial quantities - it has some pros and cons. I posted some stuff on this forum a year or two back which is essentially unchanged - search it up and have a read. Lemongrass is a particularly strong bee attractant - you’ll see it also mentioned at times for luring swarms. Spearmint I’m not sure. Lavender also gets added - it is quite aggressive towards mites, so I like to think it is doing something in that regard. Maybe it’s not, who really knows.

 

My bees are healthy and I’d like to keep them that way.  As honey prices have fallen off, so has my sugar usage (probably like many commercials).  But I still use it in particular situations - for me strong hives early for pollination is one such use.

 

cheers

I will have a look. Nice healthy strong bees early in the season gives so much scope for expanding without weakening. I hope to make two new hives if possible this year. With new Queens. And plan to re Q my old hive. My Q must be 4? How long do they live? Should google it! Tudor might seeI have asked!!?

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12 hours ago, Sailabee said:

Adding a cocktail of unproven essential oils will not overcame those problems. 

While there is no substitute for good beekeeping at the right time I have to say that I was quite surprised what my unproven concoction did for my site of duds that have turned into a box + of bees. Start of may.

Screenshot_20190917-191837.png

Mid aug

Screenshot_20190917-191600.png

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5 minutes ago, Jamo said:

While there is no substitute for good beekeeping at the right time I have to say that I was quite surprised what my unproven concoction did for my site of duds that have turned into a box + of bees. Start of may.

Screenshot_20190917-191837.png

Any expert can see that this hive is destined for greatness

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6 minutes ago, Philbee said:

Would your now proven concoction dissolve in Glycerin 

 a single narrow per hive maybe

300 for dollar 50

Seams to work when dissolved in sugar syrup. Without the sugar uptake might not be so good. Danser proved the basic concoction before me.

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I prefer  not put anything into my hives. Yes I use varroa treatments but that is to keep them alive. I have done small trials with artificial pollen and also seaweed without any huge visible benefit . Bees have got by for tens of thousands of years without seaweed ,essential oils , artificial pollen et cetera. Honey is a pure natural product and  I'm pretty keen to keep it that way. Yes if an essential oil turned out to control varoa then I would use it (after testing for residues because not all essential oils are harmless). I can see no other reason for using them.

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33 minutes ago, john berry said:

I prefer  not put anything into my hives. Yes I use varroa treatments but that is to keep them alive. I have done small trials with artificial pollen and also seaweed without any huge visible benefit . Bees have got by for tens of thousands of years without seaweed ,essential oils , artificial pollen et cetera. Honey is a pure natural product and  I'm pretty keen to keep it that way. Yes if an essential oil turned out to control varoa then I would use it (after testing for residues because not all essential oils are harmless). I can see no other reason for using them.

I totally agree that  bees getting what they need themselves is the best situation and for the first 20 years of my beekeeping that worked fine and beekeeping was easy.

in the last 5 years however things have changed for me. Maybe more bees / less resources, maybe mites and their effects on the bees fat bodies, could even be increased co2 levels reducing the pollen quantity?

What I know for sure is I can't always get  away with doing what I used to and expecting the bees to be fine.

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2 minutes ago, Jamo said:

I totally agree that  bees getting what they need themselves is the best situation and for the first 20 years of my beekeeping that worked fine and beekeeping was easy.

in the last 5 years however things have changed for me. Maybe more bees / less resources, maybe mites and their effects on the bees fat bodies, could even be increased co2 levels reducing the pollen quantity?

What I know for sure is I can't always get  away with doing what I used to and expecting the bees to be fine.

So far I still mostly get away with doing what I've always done but I do understand where you're coming from.  Every year the hives seem just a little bit weaker come spring time and if the trend keeps on going that way we are all going to be deep in it. I am not against people trying things I am however against the wholesale use of supplements without proof of benefit. If you find a product to be both necessary and beneficial then I can see why people would make the choice to use it.

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17 minutes ago, john berry said:

Every year the hives seem just a little bit weaker come spring time

Do you think this is due to overstocking , to enviromental changes , to new diseases in the bees.

If the hive numbers in NZ halve to you think bee vitality will return or have things changed permanently for the worse.?

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17 hours ago, kaihoka said:

Do you think this is due to overstocking , to enviromental changes , to new diseases in the bees.

If the hive numbers in NZ halve to you think bee vitality will return or have things changed permanently for the worse.?

Overstocking is definitely not helping but I think varoa is the primary cause and possibly the varroa treatments we are using. At least I am still doing better than some. One large local beehaver seems to have lost around 50% of his hives over the winter judging by all empty spots I see as I drive by. These days you have to be 100% on the ball . Back in the day many orchardists had hives down the back that weren't checked from one year to the next and most of them survived fine.

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On 17/09/2019 at 7:22 PM, Jamo said:

While there is no substitute for good beekeeping at the right time I have to say that I was quite surprised what my unproven concoction did for my site of duds that have turned into a box + of bees. Start of may.

Screenshot_20190917-191837.png

Mid aug

Screenshot_20190917-191600.png

jamo is that an off the shelve concoction, or made up one, seems to have done the trick. 

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