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Groooaaan. So don't make them that long then! Honestly same principle with standard frames.... sigh ah well call it lawn art and proceed with the knocking. Same as a hour high super without the need to lift boxes for inspection or manipulation of hive honey would be on one side when lowered. The side that has a support bracket. Lifting one of those frame a lot easier that hefting supers. Large spoon extraction method  much better than extractors such as the hand spinners anyway. 

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1 minute ago, Alastair said:

Is that Phil Chandler?

No another chap who has designed some beehive equipent and sells the plans. Have requested to purchase plans and will look to send on his details to those interested. After doing my back in thought it looked an interesting option. Not sure what Phil is up to these days as last I looked there seemed to be a shift away from TBH possibly due to badgers quite liking them too.

 

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11 minutes ago, Alastair said:

Wow quite a resemblance.

 

If Phil's moving away from top bars, what's he moving to? I thought a TBH would be at least as badger resistant as any other hive if not more so.

If I recall correctly the badgers would rip through the screen floors and say yum yum. Remember a video showing some damage and think he sorted it but was keen on a hive of a new design which had a huge box at the bottom full of branches and twigs to encourage symbiosis with other bugs. Looked like a "beggar" to take care of and huge "dadant" type box. Dredging the memory banks on this tho. Found it as the smaller version "Quatratic Hive" 

 

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  • 1 month later...

I've got a book at home called the quest for the perfect hive by Gene Kritsky . Read this book and you realise that different, way out and weird hives have been round for a long time. The reality is bees will live in just about anything. At least this new design acknowledges that bees prefer to live in the vertical rather than horizontal but the frames are far too big and I would expect them to sag under their own weight. My long hive wasn't perfect as far as the bees were concerned but they did live in it and produce honey and it would be a lot simpler than making this new design. I saw a lot of different hives in England and each had its advantages and disadvantages but as far as commercial beekeeping goes I don't think you can go past the interchangeability of everything being completely standard.

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The real issue for me was going from vertical to horizontal with the "top end" fully loaded with honey would require a feat of engineering at the "hinge" as the weight of two full supers may require befriending a weight-lifter. It's probably some special hinge at the fulcrum as design is patented. Otherwise be up on step ladder to rob one frame at a time as somewhat out of practice with eye-lid fluttering. 

Edited by Jean MacDonald
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@mischief Hi Got a long hive too but my bees like going up. It's a good one too with a partition so experiment in the offing for split then tower hive and nucs, possibilities endless but in much the same boat with lifting so proceeding with caution. Would run quail underneath if they weren't such rowdy things. Liked the idea of this one as could grow a hive up with advantage of working like a long hive. Even the frame by frame method was a bit much a while ago. 

Edited by Jean MacDonald
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On 12/09/2018 at 8:43 PM, mischief said:

Give them time....they are used to langs.....maybe/probably.

I have a feeling it takes time for them to get used to something different.

 

Frame grips... from Ecrotek.

I found these made a huge difference for me.

I now have some more so my new (to-be) hives have their own.

Good luck with the soon to be hives. Hoping to split mine just before the solstice with a harvest of Ross rounds as Xmas presents. Also considering a "tower hive" set up for pulling drone frames if I decide to go for that. Found idea on YouTube "Crazy things that beekeepers try" and thought yep that's me. My last round of experimentation yielded "ankle-biters" good mite drop with legs missing. Epigenetics can bee very interesting. 

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