Jump to content

Beekeeping in Hungary


Gabor
 Share

Recommended Posts

1 minute ago, kaihoka said:

What can you tell me about phacelia in Hungarian honey production 

 

it't not a very popular honey to eat but bees collecting it big time. the hungarian name for phaecelia is "honey pouring grass" due to its high nectar yield, almost as high as acacia

 

in organic healthcare they use it on wounds and skin bruises

 

phaecelia honey usually end up in multifloral honey it's rare on its own but available from smaller producers. apparently phaecelia honey has better taste in the southern part of Europe (italy, spain) for some reason

Link to post
Share on other sites

10 minutes ago, Gabor said:

 

it't not a very popular honey to eat but bees collecting it big time. the hungarian name for phaecelia is "honey pouring grass" due to its high nectar yield, almost as high as acacia

 

in organic healthcare they use it on wounds and skin bruises

 

phaecelia honey usually end up in multifloral honey it's rare on its own but available from smaller producers. apparently phaecelia honey has better taste in the southern part of Europe (italy, spain) for some reason

I grow it and the bees love it .

I heard it was nice . 

Have you tried it .

Link to post
Share on other sites

1 minute ago, kaihoka said:

I grow it and the bees love it .

I heard it was nice . 

Have you tried it .

yes, I have as my mum knew a thing or two about herbs and natural health things (before it was cool, hehe) and she knew people so we got some time to time when coughing was around.

I liked it, it's rather silky, very pleasant taste I recall, we had it by a spoonful, never tasted it on toast. It's not a strong tasting honey but very nice.

 

I bet bees love phaecelia, it's full of nectar and produces it for long periods of time

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks @Gaborfor the great info about the origin of the NB and Hunor.

It is interesting how many type of hives developed over a couple of centuries just in Eastern Europe(inventing and adopting from the neighbors with minor modifications).

 

However nowadays many commercials adopted the Langstroth, possibly because of the automatic extraction lines available on the world market.

Edited by Kiwi Bee
Link to post
Share on other sites

Just now, Kiwi Bee said:

However nowadays many commercials adopted the Langstroth, possibly because of the automatic extraction lines available on the world market.

 

Yes, Langstroth is so widespread, there's a great commercial hinterland for this system, frame makers, foundations, boxes, extractors, etc. it is well developed so it can be running on commercial level on lower costs. I visited the hungarian beekeepers forum (like this one just not that flash :) and came across a conversation where somebody was complaining about plastic frames, they don't fit into his exctractor. 

 

Plastic is very rare there they're just started experiencing with it in the last few years (in NB and halfNB sizes, locally made) and with plastic foundation, 99% is running on wooden frames and wax foundation.

It's not easy to convert from mixed gear to 3/4 boxes, imagine what would mean to change from NB to langstroth...

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

39 minutes ago, Gabor said:

just find a paper on phaecelia:

 

on 1ha it can yield 800kg of honey during the 4-8 weeks of the flowering (if the weather allows)

commercials run 4-6 colony/ha on phaecelia fields

 

phaecelia.thumb.jpg.b21aefebe13d803be3469e5cd61c2e6b.jpg

phaece.thumb.jpg.d178c6541622b9bfad4956814f92e3ab.jpg

Where is that , Hungary.

I might have read the same paper. That's why I asked you about phacelia.

What nectar sources in NZ support 4/ 6 hives a hectare?

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

39 minutes ago, kaihoka said:

Where is that , Hungary.

I might have read the same paper. That's why I asked you about phacelia.

What nectar sources in NZ support 4/ 6 hives a hectare?

 

 

You mean where is Hungary on the map or where is that field in Hungary?

With all due respect I doubt you read the same paper, I read this

 

UNfortunately I have no answer what crop could support 4-6 colonies per hectare, I am a newbie hobbist beek 

Link to post
Share on other sites

3 minutes ago, Predrag said:

jó napot! My hives are located some 800m of Hungarian border :) , near Kunbaya, village Gornji Tavankut.

Awesome! Isn't there a border crossing close by? I havn't been there in 20 years... what are the bees collecting? Chestnut? Sunflower?

Link to post
Share on other sites

28 minutes ago, Gabor said:

Isn't there a border crossing close by? I havn't been there in 20 years... what are the bees collecting? Chestnut? Sunflower?

few km across fields, Bajmok pass. I already wrote conditions there on post no7 from the top. www.nzbees.net/forums/topic/11822-greetings-from-serbia/

Edited by Predrag
Link to post
Share on other sites

7 hours ago, Gabor said:

 

You mean where is Hungary on the map or where is that field in Hungary?

With all due respect I doubt you read the same paper, I read this

 

UNfortunately I have no answer what crop could support 4-6 colonies per hectare, I am a newbie hobbist beek 

I meant is the photo in Hungary .

Phacelia is from southern USA.

Yes you are right,  not that paper in Hungarian :6_smile:

Unless Google had translated it .

Link to post
Share on other sites

58 minutes ago, kaihoka said:

I meant is the photo in Hungary .

Phacelia is from southern USA.

Yes you are right,  not that paper in Hungarian :6_smile:

Unless Google had translated it .

not my photo but those were taken somewhere along the road77 wich is running a few kms north from Lake Balaton

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...